BBC Experiments with Holographic Content

"The new technologies on the horizon have the potential to completely change the way that audiences experience media content in the future."
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The BBC recently created a lo-fi and low-cost experiment to determine whether making holographic images appear in front of a television set is feasible, and to gauge which type of content might work best.

As Cyrus Saihan, head of digital partnerships, explains on the BBC blog, "This wasn’t an exercise to test how well this specific prototype performed, it was intended to give us a good approximation as to what BBC content would look like on a ‘holographic’ TV, get an insight into what audiences thought of it and give us a cheap way to explore floating images in the real world. Our experiment was fairly simplistic, but the new technologies on the horizon have the potential to completely change the way that audiences experience media content in the future. You can imagine a world where instead of watching a film star being interviewed on the sofa of a TV chat show, they feel as if they are sitting right next to you on your own sofa in your living room, or where instead of looking at a 2D image of Mount Everest, it appears as if the snow on the mountain top is falling around you."

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