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Video Technology in 2020: What May/Could/Definitely Will Happen, and How It’ll Impact Your Workflow

A series of articles designed to put new and emerging video technologies into perspective

Oliver Peters developed a series of articles designed to put new and emerging video technologies into perspective. To read each section, click on the link below:

Video Technology 2020 – Cameras

RED’s Monstro 8K VV, Helium 8K S35 and Gemini 5K S35 cameras.

Video acquisition drives the rest of the production and post industry. These are the developments to watch in camera technologies during 2020: resolution, raw codecs, and mobile filmmaking.

Video Technology 2020 – Editing Software

Four editing applications dominate the professional market: Adobe Premiere ProApple Final Cut Pro XAvid Media Composer, and Blackmagic Design DaVinci Resolve. Established facilities are still heavy Avid users, with Adobe being the up-and-coming choice. This doesn’t mean that Final Cut Pro X lost out. Going into 2020, Apple can tout FCPX as the best-selling version of its professional editing tool. It most likely has three million users after nearly nine years on the market. While pro editors in the US are often reluctant to adopt FCPX, this innovative application has earned wider acceptance in the broader international market.

Avid Media Composer

The three “A”s have been battling for editing market share, but the wild card is Blackmagic Design’s DaVinci Resolve. It started as a high-end color correction application, but through Blackmagic’s acquisitions and fast development pace, Resolve is becoming an all-in-one application rivaling Autodesk Smoke or Avid DS. Recent versions bring enhanced creative editing tools, making it possible to edit, mix, composite, grade, and deliver entirely from Resolve. No need to roundtrip with other applications. Blackmagic is so dedicated to Resolve as an editor that they introduced a special editor keyboard.

Video Technology 2020 – Apple and the PC Landscape

Apple enjoys a small fraction of the total computer market, yet has an oversized influence on video production and post. Look anywhere in our business and you’ll see a high percentage of Apple Mac computers and laptops in use by producers, DITs, editors, mixers, and colorists. This has influenced the development and deployment of certain technologies, such as optimization for MetalThunderbolt i/oProRes codecs, and more.

Mac Pro and Mac Pro Display XDR

This may irritate Windows users, but it’s something companies like AvidAdobe, and others cannot ignore. Apple deprecates OpenGL, OpenCL, and CUDA in favor of Metal, and so, developers of software for Apple computers will follow suit so that their Mac-based customers enjoy a good experience.

Video Technology 2020 – The Cloud

The “cloud” is merely a collection of physical data centers in multiple locations around the world—not much different than a small storage center you might have. Of course, they employ more advanced systems for power, redundancy, and security than you do. When you work with one of the companies marketing cloud-based editing or a review-and-approval service, like Frame.io or Wipster, they provide the user-facing interface, but are actually renting storage space from one of the big three cloud providers—GoogleAmazon, or Microsoft.

Frame.io

There are three reasons that I’m skeptical about ubiquitous, cloud-based editing (with media at native resolutions) in the short term: upload speeds, cost, and security.

Video Technology 2020 – Sharing Storage

Shared storage used to be the domain of “heavy iron” facilities with AvidFacilis, and earlier Apple Xserve systems providing the horsepower. Thanks to advances in networking and Ethernet technology, shared storage is accessible to any user. Whether built-in or via adapters, modern computers can tap into 1Gbps, 10Gbps, and even higher, networking speeds. Most computers can natively access Gigabit Ethernet networks (1Gbps)—adequate for SD and HD workflows. Computers designed for the pro video market increasingly sport built-in 10GbE ports, enabling comfortable collaboration with 4K media and up. Some of today’s most popular shared storage vendors include QNAPSynology, and LumaForge.

The QNAP TVS-672N is a cost-effective 5GbE/2.5GbE NAS with Intel Core i3 Processor, DDR4 Memory and SSD caching for ultimate storage performance,

This technology will become more prolific in 2020, with systems easier to connect and administer, making shared storage as plug-and-play as any local drives. Network Attached Storage (NAS) systems can service a single workstation or multiple users. In fact, companies like QNAP even offer consumer versions of these products designed to operate as home media servers. Even LumaForge sells a version of its popular Jellyfish through the online Apple Store. A simple, on-line connection guide will get you up and running, no IT department required. This is ideal for the individual editor or small post shop.

Read more: What Film Technologies Will Define the Next Decade?

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