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“1917” Isn’t the First (Supposedly) One-Shot Film. Here’s a Timeline. (The New York Times)

Here's a history of films that have used long takes to pack a powerful punch.

George MacKay as Schofield in “1917,” co-written and directed by Sam Mendes

Read more: 1917: How Sam Mendes and Roger Deakins Made Their “One-Shot” War Epic

Read more: A Brief History of “One-Shot” Films (No Film School)

“‘Action!’ ‘Cut!’ They’re the two most common words you might expect to hear on a film set. One gets the cameras rolling; the other stops them. The question then becomes what to do with all the footage. The art of editing, of assembling various camera angles of various scenes for dramatic effect, has long been a crucial component of cinema, from D.W. Griffith’s crosscutting in “Birth of a Nation” to Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho” shower scene to Paul Greengrass’s white-knuckle “Bourne” action sequences.” – Source: The New York Times

Read more.

BIRDMAN OR (THE UNEXPECTED VIRTUE OF IGNORANCE) (aka BIRDMAN), Michael Keaton, on set, 2014.  TM and Copyright ©Fox Searchlight Pictures/courtesy Everett Collection

WHY THIS MATTERS:

From Alfred Hitchcock’s Rope to Andy Warhol’s experimental art film Empire and Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s Oscar-winning Birdman, here’s a history of films that have used long takes to pack a powerful punch.

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