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Video Technology 2020 – Cameras

RED’s Monstro 8K VV, Helium 8K S35 and Gemini 5K S35 cameras.

Video acquisition drives the rest of the production and post industry. These are the developments to watch in camera technologies during 2020: resolution, raw codecs, and mobile filmmaking.

Resolution

Striving for larger resolutions has been the default camera manufacturer mode since the shift to single-sensor technology. HD (1920×1080) was abandoned long ago with a bigger resolution just around the corner each year. Currently 16K is the Holy Grail, although broadcast or streaming distribution platforms don’t come close. While 16K may be aspirational, sensor manufacturers have settled on 6K and/or 8K as the preferred target resolutions beyond 4K/UHD. Bayer pattern sensors used in many cameras benefit from oversampling, meaning the 6K or 8K images yield better results when downsampled to 4K than a native 4K sensor. Look for most high-end cameras to use an approach based on this premise.

Camera Raw Codecs

Camera raw recording was used before RED Digital Cinema, but RED brought raw codecs for movie files into mainstream production. Camera raw codecs are generally proprietary to specific companies, even though they may be widely and openly distributed. 2020 should bring the shakeout between the new raw codecs introduced by Apple and Blackmagic Design. Apple ProRes Raw is not tied to any specific brand of camera, but so far has only been enabled on Atomos recorders and some DJI cameras. Expect that to change in 2020, with additional manufacturers signing up to natively record ProRes Raw in-camera. Naturally this requires support from more than just Final Cut Pro X. Currently Blackmagic RAW enjoys wider post support, however, I don’t see it becoming dominant unless Blackmagic cameras gain a wider market share. Their price is right with plenty of happy customers, but Blackmagic cameras still don’t have the brand appeal of Sony, Panasonic, RED, Canon, or ARRI.

A Blackmagic RAW format was used on the indie sci-fi thriller ‘Portal.’

Mobile Filmmaking

The Apple iPhone and small format factor cameras, like the DJI Osmo Pocket, have revolutionized video acquisition. The quality achieved in these cameras rivals many high-end production cameras, but with a considerably lighter footprint. The form factor and ease of production—coupled with built-in stabilization, gimbals, and camera apps like FiLMiC Pro and Mavis—enable new production styles and story concepts that would otherwise not be possible or would be cost-prohibitive using traditional methods. One only has to look at how drones have become the dominant form of aerial photography over manned helicopters and just think how similar technology will impact other modes of production.

DJI Osmo Pocket

Newer technologies, like smart phone cameras, are software-based devices. They will be first to deploy machine learning and AI as a way to enhance the image before those same technologies come to traditional production cameras. Some computational features, like deep or shallow focus, bokeh effects, etc. already exist for the still camera within these phones. But imagine the possibilities of applying AI-based image profiles to your movie images, such as day-for-night or hyper-real photographic-style HDR looks. So while the purist will opt for a Sony or ARRI, others will take advantage of these new features that are available in the palm of their hand.

 

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