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Editing “The Banker” on Final Cut Pro X: “It’s Always Hard to Learn to Walk Again”

“Final Cut Pro X is an evolving NLE—as they all are. It was a good experience cutting a movie on it. Some editors are hesitant, because that first hour is difficult and I totally get that.”

Read more: The Banker: AppleTV’s First Movie Is An Excellent Investment

Read more: The Banker: Wheeling and Dealing Toward Equality

Directed by George Nolfi, “The Banker tells the true story of Bernard Garrett (Anthony Mackie) and Joe Morris (Samuel L. Jackson), a wily pair of African-American entrepreneurs who made themselves part of the real-estate game in Los Angeles, with the goal of getting rich (which they did) and, at the same time, of breaking the color line, making it possible for black citizens to move into formerly all-white neighborhoods,” writes Owen Gleiberman.

“Knowing that the real-estate business is the right arm of the banking business, the two sought to maneuver their way into the latter. Yet due to the color of their skin, they could barely get through the door. So they recruited a white man, a home-repair worker named Matt Steiner (Nicholas Hoult), to act as a front for them. They trained him to walk like a banker, talk like a banker, and think like a banker. That’s when the plot thickened.” To read the full article, click here.

Nicholas Hoult, Samuel L. Jackson and Anthony Mackie in “The Banker,” from Apple TV+.
Nicholas Hoult, Samuel L. Jackson and Anthony Mackie in “The Banker,” from Apple TV+.

Editing The Banker on Final Cut Pro X, the film’s producer and editor Joel Viertel admits to Oliver Peters, “It’s always hard to learn to walk again. That’s what a lot of editors bump into with Final Cut Pro X, because it is a very different approach than any other NLE. I found that once you get to know it and rewire your brain that you can be very fast on it. A lot of the things that it does are revolutionary and pretty incredible.

Anthony Mackie, Nia Long, Samuel L. Jackson and Nicholas Hoult in “The Banker,” from Apple TV+
Anthony Mackie, Nia Long, Samuel L. Jackson and Nicholas Hoult in “The Banker,” from Apple TV+

“We used Final Cut Pro X to edit a movie shot on film, which is kind of a first at this level, but it’s not like we crashed into some huge problem with that,” Viertel continues. “We gamed it out and it all worked like it was supposed to. Obviously it doesn’t do some stuff the same way. Fortunately, through our relationship with Apple, we can make some suggestions about that. But there really isn’t anything it doesn’t do. If that were the case, we would have just said that we can’t cut with this.

Samuel L. Jackson and Anthony Mackie in “The Banker,” from Apple TV+.
Samuel L. Jackson and Anthony Mackie in “The Banker,” from Apple TV+.

“Final Cut Pro X is an evolving NLE—as they all are,” Viertel concludes. “It was a good experience cutting a movie on it. Some editors are hesitant, because that first hour is difficult and I totally get that. But if you push through that and get to know it—there are many things that are very good and addictively good. I would certainly cut another movie on it.” To read the full interview, click here.

 

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