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“Togo:” New Technologies, 19th-Century Tones

Company 3 colorist Siggy Ferstl spent a whole year refining a specific look for the Disney+ period piece.

“Filmmakers have spent decades trying to get ever sharper, richer, more colorful moving images,” writes David Bloom. “But when it came to creating TogoDisney+’s recently released feature-length project, director Ericson Core and senior colorist Siggy Ferstl spent months making the film look like a series of stills shot a century ago.” Read more here.

Togo colorist Siggy Ferstl spent a whole year refining a specific look for the Disney+ period piece, evoking a restrained palette that goes against the splashy, saturated look usually associated with Disney films. “We had to limit the latitude and restrict the color gamut to a more painterly, grounded image,” says the colorist. “There was definitely some playing around with how we handled the highlights.”

From the Disney+ feature “Togo,” courtesy of Disney Enterprises 2019

“While Ferstl would normally be using the color grading tools that one associates with Blackmagic’s Resolve to accomplish this,” reports Mike Seymour, “Ferstl used this project as an opportunity to harness the power of Resolve’s Fusion software. He worked hard to bring into the final grading session a number of elements that would normally have to be sent out to VFX. For this project a traditional pipeline would have added an enormous amount of time and budget to the process, likely making it prohibitive and unachievable.” To read the full article, click here.

Read more: Togo: Dogs and Digital Autochrome 

 

“Ferstl started this large task by dividing the process into a series of layers that would work together to affect the color, of course, but also create lens distortion, aging artifacts and all the other effects,” reports postPerspective. “A number of these operations would traditionally be sent to Company 3’s VFX department or to an outside vendor to be created by their artists and returned as finished elements. But that kind of workflow would have added an enormous amount of time to the post process. And, just as importantly, all these effects and color corrections needed to work interactively during grading sessions at Company 3 so Ferstl and Core could continuously see and refine the overall look. Even a slight tweak to a single layer could affect how other layers performed, so Ferstl needed complete, realtime control of every layer for every fine adjustment,” To read the full article, click here.

Read more: Color Grading Togo With an Autochrome-type Look

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