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‘The Handmaid’s Tale:’ Developing a New Vision of Dystopia

Reed Morano infused the society with romantic, impressionistic images that lull viewers into a complacency — just before reminding viewers, in shocking ways, exactly where these characters find themselves.

Despite the nightmarish world that her complicated, maligned characters reside within, the director of the first three episodes of The Handmaid’s Tale has managed to use her filmmaking skills to create a visually stunning cinematic experience — one that, it turns out, barely stays within the boundaries of what’s acceptable in today’s TV environment.

“I pushed the boundaries as far as my producers and MGM would let me,” says Reed Morano, whose new Hulu new series has been adapted from a Margaret Atwood novel of the same name. The series offers up visions of a world where women, dissidents and homosexuals are stripped of their rights and forced to adhere to a strict and colorless Puritan value system whose rules are enforced with violence.

An experienced cinematographer, Morano infused the bleak society of Gilead with romantic, impressionistic images that have the ability to lull viewers into a complacency — just before reminding viewers, in shocking ways, exactly where these characters find themselves. To read the full interview with Morano, click here.

The series is clearly resonating with viewers. Picked up for a second season for 2018, the series premiere has been watched by more Hulu viewers than any other series premiere, according to its producers. The series is produced by MGM Television and marks the first collaboration for an original series between Hulu and MGM. 

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