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First Dispatches from “The French Dispatch”

“Many times he will describe what he wants to shoot and I will think ‘that’s going to be really difficult,’ but somehow we always pull it off.”

Director Wes Anderson and cinematographer Robert Yeoman, ASC, re-teamed for Anderson’s tenth film, The French Dispatch. 

“The trailer, in true Wes Anderson form, features title cards for each story,” explains Carter Burrowes. “The first is called ‘The Concrete Masterpiece’ and features Adrian Brody trying to buy a painting from a famous artist and inmate played by Benicio del Toro. The second is called ‘Revisions to a Manifesto’ and is about student riots being covered by Frances McDormand and Timothée Chalamet. The final story is called ‘The Private Dining Room of the Police Commissioner,’ with Jeffrey Wright dining with and writing about a culinary master and police commissioner, played by Stephen Park, when a kidnapping is reported.” To read the full article, click here.

“Working on a film with Wes is not just limited to what transpires on the set, you are signing up for a life adventure,” says Yeoman. “Whether on a boat in Italy, a train in India, or a small city in France the experience is all encompassing. Wes has his own unique way of working and often challenges us all to ‘think outside the box.’

“Many times he will describe what he wants to shoot and I will think ‘that’s going to be really difficult,’ but somehow we always pull it off. The shooting process itself is rarely easy, but I think that everyone feels that they are part of something special.

“When I received his script for The French Dispatch I was immediately drawn to the various stories, each original in its tone and style,” Yeoman says. “The characters and situations held great creative possibilities and I was ready for another adventure!”

Watch: Cinematographer Robert Yeoman, ASC on the Visual Grammar of Film

Read more: An Inspired Adventure on the Isle of Dogs

Read more: The Wes Anderson Aesthetic

 

 

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