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“The Camera Writes:” Cinematographers Discuss the Year’s Biggest Films

Rodrigo Prieto, Roger Deakins, Caleb Deschanel, Robert Richardson, César Charlone and Natasha Braier gather for The Hollywood Reporter’s annual Cinematographer Roundtable.

Rodrigo Prieto, Roger Deakins, Caleb Deschanel, Robert Richardson, César Charlone and Natasha Braier gather for ‘The Hollywood Reporter’s annual Cinematographer Roundtable. Image by Kwaku Alston.

“For Marty [Scorsese], the camera ‘writes’ in a way. Every camera angle has a meaning to it. If the camera moves or doesn’t, there is always a reason for that. He does extensive shot listings and diagrams and drawings and shares those with me. And he pretty much sticks to it. With The Irishman, he wanted it to have this sense of the routine of this man who is a killer, much less fancy camerawork. Also, he thought that this should be like a home movie, but not Super 8 or grainy 16 or handheld. So how do you do a home movie if you don’t do any of those things, right? But then that’s how I thought to emulate still photography of the ’50s and ’60s and the emulsions of those different eras.” —Rodrigo Prieto, Director of Photography, The Irishman (Source: The Hollywood Reporter)

Why This Matters:

The Hollywood Reporter’s Carolyn Giardina spoke with Rodrigo Prieto (The Irishman), Roger Deakins (1917 and The Goldfinch), Caleb Deschanel (The Lion King), Robert Richardson (Once Upon a Time in Hollywood), César Charlone (The Two Popes) and Natasha Braier (Honey Boy) for the magazine’s annual Cinematographer Roundtable, uncovering insights about how some of the biggest feature films of the year were photographed.

Read more: “The Camera Writes:” Roger Deakins, Caleb Deschanel and the Cinematographer Roundtable (The Hollywood Reporter)

 

Want more expert insights?

Read more: “1917:” How Sam Mendes and Roger Deakins Pulled Off Their “One-Shot” War Epic

Read more: “Honey Boy” Cinematographer Natasha Braier and the Film’s Improvisational “Dance of Light”

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