"It's a movie about talking dogs. Yet it's not a cartoon—it's a movie. I think it pushes the boundary in terms of what people think can be done in this medium."

Detailing director Wes Anderson's upcoming stop-motion film Isle of Dogs, Jenny Brewer explains that it's "set in Japan, 20 years in the future, in the fictional city of Megasaki, where the corrupt mayor Kobayashi—a cat lover with a vendetta for all dogs—exiles all the furry fiends to Trash Island, the city's rubbish dump. There, the starving dogs form clans and fight for food, as well as gossip about the latest island rumors, while Kobayashi makes malevolent plans for their future. Meanwhile the mayor's nephew goes on a mission to save his beloved dog Spots, and crash lands on Trash Island, where the adventure ensues.

A scene from Isle of Dogs. Photo courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures, © 2018 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation 

A scene from Isle of Dogs. Photo courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures, © 2018 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation 

Read more: How Wes Anderson's Stop-Motion Epic Was Made

Read more: Stop-Motion Cinematography: Q&A With Isle of Dogs DP Tristan Oliver 

Read more: The Visual Effects of Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs

"Visually, Isle of Dogs is a beautiful and authentic homage to Japanese culture and history," Brewer continues. "Suddenly Wes Anderson's obsession with symmetry and immaculate attention to detail takes on new meaning in this context. From the set designs of the city to the hand drawn maps, woodblock print-inspired animations on the TVs, and the comedically adapted version of Hokusai's The Wave, the production screams of being made by an obvious Japanophile, without any pastiche." 

A scene from Isle of Dogs. Photo courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures, © 2018 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation 

A scene from Isle of Dogs. Photo courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures, © 2018 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation 

"It's also structured like a Japanese play, split into acts, with dramatic narration and traditional music," Brewer concludes. "As it's told with the grandeur of an old Japanese fairytale, this sets up a brilliant complement to the scruffy dogs (voiced by the likes of Bryan Cranston, Jeff Goldblum and, of course, Bill Murray) and their deadpan quips, and it's this contrast that heightens the impact of the comic timing, which at times is sharp as a sushi knife. Even a glance to camera from a cynical or confused dog is enough to make the audience burst into laughter." To read the full article, click here.

Read more: Storyboarding Isle of Dogs: How Wes Anderson Channelled Kurosawa 

Read more: Wes Anderson's Scintillating Stop-Motion Film Has Bite

Read more: Wes Anderson's Homage to Man's Best Friend is Spot On

"The production design is consistently inspired and often quite beautiful: rippling glittery seas, a line of elongated doggie shadows marching along a wall of garbage, a multicolored hideout made of discarded sake bottles," says Jonathan Romney. There is so much detail in the breakneck race from image to image that Isle of Dogs will reward multiple viewings as much as any Anderson film, visually if not narratively." To read the full article, click here.

Isle of Dogs graphic designer Erica Dorn, who grew up in Japan, explains, "The world of Isle of Dogs is kind of an alternative reality. It looks and feels like Japan, but it's a slightly dreamier version, a slightly more Wes Anderson version. That is the beauty of setting the film in a made-up city, in a made-up time: you get a certain amount of artistic license. 

"The blending of old and new is very common in Japan. There are scenes in the film that are very minimalist and wabi-sabi; but then you switch over to the city, which is maximalist and very intense. So, there's that feeling of Japan but it's all filtered through Wes's own way of seeing."

Read more: Here's How Wes Anderson Built the Incredible World in Isle of Dogs 

Read more: The Fast And The Furry Us: Wes Anderson's Masterful Isle of Dogs 

Read more: Wes Anderson on the Politics of Isle of Dogs and a Return to Stop-Motion

Isle of Dogs poster

Isle of Dogs poster

Producer Jeremy Dawson recounts that it was the film's extreme design challenges—even for Anderson who has a way with dizzyingly complex spaces—that led the director to think in terms of another stop-motion film. It just seemed the matching form for emotionally fluent, if down-and-out, dogs and a Japanese island lined with society's strange, funny and downright calamitous discards.

"If it were possible for Wes to do this live action, maybe he would have," Dawson says, "but it's not something that could have been done. It's a movie about talking dogs. Yet it's not a cartoon—it's a movie. I think it pushes the boundary in terms of what people think can be done in this medium."

Read more: Cinematographer Tristan Oliver illuminates the whimsical futurescape of director Wes Anderson's stop-motion feature Isle of Dogs

Production on Isle of Dogs involved more than 670 crew members, including more than 70 manning the puppet department and another 38 in the animation department. The heart, humor and inventiveness of Isle of Dogs had to be stitched out of 130,000 stills that create the illusion of immersive action.

A scene from Isle of Dogs. Photo courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures, © 2018 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation 

A scene from Isle of Dogs. Photo courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures, © 2018 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation 

Says animation producer Simon Quinn: "Wes enjoys animation for what it is. He's not trying to hide the fact that these are made objects. He's celebrating the art form. He's not trying to compete with CG. He's actually saying, 'Okay, this is a model set. So how can we play with that? What sort of visual gags can we use in that?' You end up doing things like using cotton wadding for smoke or carving soap to make candle flames. All of these things are joyous. They're the things that make the work exciting."

Read more: Wes Anderson Explains Hayao Miyazaki's Influence on Isle of Dogs and Stop Motion Challenges

Read more: Storyboard Artist Jay Clarke on Drawing Wes Anderson's Canine Showstopper Isle of Dogs

Related

BlackBox-Radian

Black Box Radian Flex Software-Based Video Wall Platform Earns ISE Best of Show Award

Black Box, an industry-leading provider of pro AV connectivity and signal distribution systems, today announced that the company's Radian Flex software-based video wall platform won an ISE Best of Show Award from AV Technology Europe, a Future Publishing magazine. Of the more than 1,000 exhibitors at ISE 2019, only 15 — including Black Box with Radian Flex — earned this award, which recognizes achievements and innovations in product and service development.

Luxul_XMS-1208P

Luxul to Bring Reliability and High Performance to IBS 2019 With Latest Networking Solutions for the Smart Home

Luxul, the leading innovator of IP networking solutions for AV integrators, today announced its technology line-up for the NAHB International Builders' Show (IBS), taking place February 19-21 in Las Vegas. In the Legrand booth SU614, the company will exhibit a wide range of solutions for home builders that deliver reliable, high-performance networks in smart homes, including Gigabit switches; the next generation of wireless controller technology; indoor and outdoor wireless access points (APs); wired and wireless routers; intelligent network power distribution units (PDU); and the Wi-Fi Assurance Program exclusively for builders.

HoverCam_Pilot3

HoverCam's Pilot Series and ClassFusion Learning Platform Land Big Wins at TCEA 2019

HoverCam, a leader in innovative, interactive, and engaging education solutions, announced that the company's digital classroom solutions received three major honors from Tech & Learning at the recent Texas Computer Education Association (TCEA) 2019 Conference in San Antonio. At the show, HoverCam's Pilot 3 digital teaching station received the Award of Excellence in the District category, while the company's new Pilot X podium and ClassFusion software platform both earned Best of Show honors. The awards were presented on Feb. 6 at a special ceremony held at Casa Rio restaurant in San Antonio.

Veritone_CollegeFootballPlayoff

College Football Playoff Uses Veritone's AI and Digital Asset Management Solutions to Enable Richer Media Coverage

Veritone Inc. (Nasdaq: VERI), the creator of the world's first operating system for artificial intelligence, aiWARE™, today announced that the College Football Playoff (CFP) leveraged an expanded deployment of Veritone solutions and services for the 2019 CFP National Championship to give members of the media even faster and richer access to its content resources. In addition to the CFP's Digital Media Hub, a white-label digital asset management portal from Veritone, the CFP also utilized Veritone's Live Event Services and aiWARE artificial intelligence platform for the first time. With aiWARE, the CFP was able to apply artificial intelligence to video footage and still images of press conferences, interviews and other Media Day events to produce transcriptions, automated facial recognition of players and coaches, logo identification, and other tasks enabling expedited and enhanced coverage of the 2019 College Football Playoff National Championship. For the first time, the CFP was able to make Media Day press conference clips and images available for search and immediate download within minutes of delivery. Following the success of this deployment, CFP has renewed its agreement with Veritone through the 2020 championship game in New Orleans.