Archive for November, 2011

State-of-the-Art Architecture Meets Cutting-Edge Technology with Vaddio Cameras

By combining innovative architecture and audiovisual technology with the growing needs of one of Canada’s fastest-growing cities; Vaughan’s new 180,000-square-foot City Hall easily meets the needs of Vaughan’s growing population and enhances the delivery of municipal services. Vaddio cameras are buried throughout the city council chamber and committee rooms, in walls, above ceilings and in half-walls so they are unobtrusive – all part of the architect’s aesthetic that Canadian-based systems integrator, Duocom, had to work with.

City of Vaughan City Council Chamber

City of Vaughan City Council Chamber

Why a New building??
Because the original City Hall building wasn’t large enough to house everyone, committee members were meeting all over the city. Nobody was under the same roof and there was no centralized place for people to meet. Old touch-to-talk microphones were daisy-chained along the table; the request-to-queue and voting system never worked. An analog recorder was used to record audio, but there were no cameras. It was a legacy system in use for 15 – 20 years.

“It was almost as if they were using what they had to get by,” explained Omar Prashad of Duocom. “It’s my assumption from the city that there’s no point in spending a bunch of money upgrading systems when you know down the line a few years you’re going to have a new building.”

According to the City of Vaughan, the previous Civic Centre was renovated in 1982 when Vaughan’s population was 36,815. Today, Vaughan’s population is 295,000, and is expected to increase to 418,000 by 2031. The old system just couldn’t withstand the rapid growth.
So through a month-long Needs Analysis process and a lot of input from different users and user groups, Duocom came up with a solution.

The Council Chamber?
From an AV perspective there are five or six significant areas – the most significant being the council chamber where regional counselors meet. ??“Walk into the Council Chamber and you feel like you’re walking into a very contemporary architectural space,” says Prashad. “The tiered seating, custom wood walls and ceilings, flown in from Denmark, and the circular council desk definitely add to the ‘modern’ appeal.” The mayor sits in the middle of the circular table with the counselors on one side and senior management on the other. The AV system for the entire facility is controlled and routed through the council chamber with a centralized architecture for control and signal distribution.

The AV system, in this room alone, cost just under $900,000. Two Christie High Lumens 1080p 3-chip projectors sit on opposite sides of the council chamber so everyone in the room has a direct view at all times. All signal routing is digital, utilizing Crestron’s Digital Media platform and control from numerous Crestron Touch Panel Displays. One sits at every desk allowing the counselors to vote, see results and make tabulations.

“Aside from the mayor, the counselors never sit in the same place,” explained Prashad. “And because during a six-hour council meeting any of the counselors could potentially be the chair of that meeting, a discrete login system for each touch panel had to be put into place.”

Each person has his/her own code. Unless you’re the designated chairperson, none are for control – just for voting and confidence monitors for whatever is on the projection screen. As opposed to the typical touch-to-talk mics, the chairperson has control over all of the mics and cameras, and is able to view the request-to-speak lists and queue on the panel in front of them.

The Vaddio Solution
?Vaddio WallVIEW HD-19 and HE-100 cameras are distinct inputs to the AV system, allowing their image to be broadcast throughout the facility or to be used in conjunction with the Polycom HD videoconferencing system, each picking up a different quadrant of the council table. One sits in the back picking up a full shot of the room. Another two sit back-right and back-left picking up opposite quadrants. The camera directly behind the mayor, faces the audience picking up the senior management team, anybody who’s addressing the council from the podium and anyone in the audience should it be required.

“The Vaddio cameras can be used with and without an operator,” added Prashad. “You can either have full pan/tilt/zoom control or you can recall presets through the Crestron control system. Our programmer had to basically create a revolutionary program that linked the Sennheiser microphone system and Biamp audio DSP system so that when a particular microphone was active, the information sends a signal to the camera to trigger the preset.”
Because the AV system as a whole was very high-end – with digital switching at 1080p/60 and 3-chip DLP projectors at 8,000 Lumens, Vaddio cameras were a necessity, explained Prashad. “If we didn’t use Vaddio cameras, the cameras would have been the weakest link in the chain. The quality in the projectors would have been negated; the switching infrastructure would have been negated. We wanted to pick out the highest quality camera that we could to take advantage of the rest of the design infrastructure.”

The video can be broadcast from the council chamber to anywhere else in the building. If there is a high-interest council meeting, the public can view the event internally – or listen externally via Vaughan Radio. While only audio is exported to the residents of Vaughan, Vaughan TV is in development stages. “We’re probably going to incorporate a capture station with a media management server and stream the video,” explained Prashad. “That’s the next generation of this system so residents can log on to the media server and see what’s happening in the council chamber from anywhere at any time.”

“The Vaddio cameras give us a lot of control over color, color temperature, brightness – so when someone looks at the mayor who’s raising taxes for the three year in a row, you see the facial expressions like you’re watching a Blu-ray. There is no point in trying to save $2,000 on cameras if the experience is going to be substandard and sub quality.”

Future Plans
?No matter how much planning goes into a large installation, down the road there are going to be changes. Phase 1 is completed and Phase 2 and 3 are on the way, with an additional building and tunnel to connect them. “Over the course of 5 to 10 years this AV system will be three times the size it is today,” Prashad predicts. “These are the fun projects because the applications allow us to use cutting-edge technology to solve user problems. That’s fun for us because we can really push the limits on the latest technology and what our team can do with it.”

2011 Kodak Film School Cinematography Competition Winners Revealed

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK, Nov. 1, 2011 — Four first-place winners – one from each major region of the world and one in a new 35 mm category – have been announced in the annual Kodak Film School Cinematography Competition. The contest is designed to recognize the creativity and talent of student cinematographers in the collaborative process of visual storytelling.

This year’s winners from the regional competition are Joshua Spires from the University of North Texas for the Americas region; Johannes Praus from the University of Film & Television “Konrad Wolf” Potsdam for the Europe-Africa-Middle East region; and Masanori Yokota from Osaka University of Arts for the Asia-Pacific region.

The winner of the worldwide 35 mm competition is Brendan Barnes from AFDA in South Africa.

The four winners will receive a trip, courtesy of Kodak, to the 2012 Clermont-Ferrand Short Film Festival in France, where they will have the opportunity to screen their films in the Kodak Short Film Showcase. The filmmakers will also participate in networking sessions and other activities that are part of the festival.

For the third consecutive year, John Bailey, ASC (The Big Miracle, Ordinary People) judged the entries. “We feel very fortunate to have John Bailey, a world-renowned cinematographer, sharing his insights, experience, and eye for talent with these students,” says Johanna Gravelle, Worldwide Image Capture marketing director for Kodak’s Entertainment Imaging Division. “We are so encouraged by the high-quality, creative filmmaking we see coming from film schools around the world. This competition is a wonderful way to recognize the talented students, and it’s just part of Kodak’s many efforts to support the emerging filmmaking community.”

The winning films explored a diverse range of topics. Spires’ film, The Whale, follows a young boy who lives in an ephemeral fantasy to try and escape the cycle of paternal abuse. Praus’ Submerged deals with a clash of cultures when a daughter brings home a boyfriend from a different circle. Yokota’s Bullet of Angry is the story of a grieving father who seeks revenge of his daughter’s killers. Those of the Water, shot by Barnes, explores an ancient Xhosa belief of Abantu (The People of the Water) that come into question after a young boy washes up from the ocean.

Second place winners were also named in each region and in the 35 mm competition. These recipients receive a $2,000 Kodak film product grant. They are: Marcella Nunes from Universidade Estácio de Sá in Brazil for Itapoanama; Dimitar Skobelev from National Academy for Theatre and Film Arts in Bulgaria for The Service; and Hachul Chung from Seoul Institute of the Arts in South Korea for Knock. The runner-up in the 35 mm competition is Lotta Kilian from University of Film and Television “Konrad Wolf” Postdam in Germany for We Die.

The Kodak Film School Cinematography Competition is open to students and recent graduates in Asia, Latin America, Canada and the U.S., as well as Europe, Africa and the Middle East. Participants compete at a national level first. Then those finalists move on to be judged for the top four spots in the competition. All entries must be produced on film by a student crew.

For more information on the Kodak Film School Cinematography Competition, visit www.kodak.com/go/filmschoolcompetition. For more information on Kodak motion picture film products and services, visit www.kodak.com/go/motion.

Follow Kodak on Facebook (www.facebook.com/KodakMotionPictureFilm), Twitter (@Kodak_ShootFilm) and YouTube (www.youtube.com/KodakShootFilm).

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QubeMaster Pro Making Digital Cinema in Soho

Dado Valentic

Colorist Dado Valentic of MyTherapy Talks about his Work and his Technology


London: Nov 1, 2011 … Soho-based Dado Valentic is a colorist and digital image workflow expert. His facility, MyTherapy, provides clients with on-set supervision, including look development, color grading and finishing, and digital distribution, with a specialization in stereo 3D.


While much of Valentic’s work is on independent feature films, such as Inbred – the latest work by director Alex Chandon – the facility also delivers commercials projects, music videos and television shows.


Traditionally colorists have not been involved in distribution, but Valentic takes a larger view. “I believe that it is our responsibility as colorists and post artists to push digital technologies forward. While camera manufacturers are creating better sensors and more refined tools, our mission is to learn how to process these images to ensure they look their very best once they reach the viewer.”

We spoke recently with Valentic at his facility in London.


Tell us about your most recent project, Inbred.



I think this is, so far, my best work. Things just came together really nicely for this project. I had just got an upgrade for my DaVinci Resolve system. It was shot in 4K, so I had these beautiful images to work with. I had an amazing director, Alex Chandon. This was his comeback project after 10 years away and he was so passionate about the film. We had a great time and everything just came together: my equipment was working great and the film was great, and when I look at it, I am very proud. I think it’s the nicest job I’ve done so far.



Did you do digital cinema mastering for Inbred?


Yes, because that is the way I work. I never just grade something and then hand over the hard drive. My job is make sure that when the film is out there in the cinema, it looks exactly the way we wanted it to look. I never take a project on without delivering it in the format that they require. I make a version for digital cinema, and then I make a one for DVD, and another for BluRay and for the internet as well.


What are some of the differences to watch for with different deliverable formats?


Cinema is different from watching a movie at home. A movie theater is much darker. The images are bigger, so my vignettes are a different size in a cinema than they are in a DVD. I make my blacks different for the cinema than for a DVD. The same thing applies for iPads. The iPad looks too dark if you put a normal cinema grade onto it, so you have to really embrace the medium you are delivering to get the best possible picture.


How much of your work is in production, or near the set?


I am getting more and more involved in set work. Postproduction is starting earlier and earlier now. I am often consulted on jobs when they are in the planning stage. My clients come to me with the script and talk about how they can make it happen best.


How did you get into digital cinema mastering?


When I was working for Sony I saw one of the very first prototypes of a DLP projector and the moment I saw those images, I knew that this is going to be the future – the images were so stunning. So even before digital cinema had become a standard, I had already started looking into ways to do it. I did a lot of research on how to get into digital cinema. That’s when I discovered this company called Qube.


I found that their approach was actually the best of all, in terms of the architecture. In 2006 I bought one of the very first mastering systems in the UK from Qube. And I became just the second or third facility in the UK to provide digital cinema mastering services. I’ve been making DCPs ever since.


What makes Qube’s DCP mastering architecture different?


The early specifications for how DCPs should be made were written by people who worked with films, so they basically took the 35mm processes of filmmaking and transferred those processes into the digital world. But digital is different. I never agreed entirely with the process that was being advocated. I felt that they were complicating things too much and that there were too many conversions. There had to be a better way to approach this process, especially when it comes to what source material to use, and how to manage color and the image size, etc. This is exactly what Qube had already figured out.


What is your approach to making DCPs?


Even today other companies force you to use specific image files as your source material for mastering DCPs, but it is much better if you can take your RAW master image, buffer it in the computer memory and do the conversions on the fly, reading the buffer and encoding into a JPEG 2000. This is what QubeMaster does. They wrote the software to be more flexible, and along with that, they introduced color management right in the beginning, which is actually the key.


You really can’t encode something without having total control over the image and color, especially if we are talking about a larger color space like P3.


You do a lot of work in stereo 3D. How is that different?


I’ve done four feature films and lots of commercials in stereo, but I still think that I have a lot to learn about stereo. We all do. It is so interesting what you can do with depth if you apply different amounts of brightness or saturation. It’s amazing how sensitive we are to even 2D clues about depth.


I’ve done a lot of 3D work in terms of brightness, which, as we all know, can be an issue with stereo projection. There is only so much light you can use in the projector, but what we can do is change the perception of brightness in the image.


How do you change the “perception of brightness?”


I found an incredible theory about light from Helmholtz, who describes the importance of local contrast for the perception of brightness. For example, if I put a black box next to white box, I would have a certain perception of brightness. If I put the same white box next to a gray box, the perception of the white will be different. Perception is subjective, but we can get so focused on the measurable aspects of light and color, we can overlook the importance of the subjective experience.


I’ve been working with a developer to write an algorithm, which we are deploying now, to apply a better perception of brightness in films. There are eight or nine color anomalies that humans have which we always need to consider during grading. We need to stop trying to measure the image and start just looking at it to see how we feel about it.


What are the challenges of mastering stereo 3D for digital cinema?


I did the very first stereo feature film in the UK called Streetdance 3D (released in 2010). Those were the early days and the biggest challenge we had then was the compatibility of servers. There are some servers out there that are so old that their hardware and software struggle with 3D content. Because you have double the frame rate in stereo, you need to reduce the bandwidth of the encoding without maxing out the server, or it starts dropping frames.


You have to be really clever with your compression to make sure you still get a good image without compression artifacts. I have seen some masters out there made by big facilities that suffer from the problem of artifacts, simply because they had to produce the DCPs quickly, or just because of carelessness. 3D mastering is tricky and it takes a lot of testing.


How does QubeMaster Pro help with stereo 3D?


QubeMaster allows you to really dig deep into your files and adjust them exactly. You can go as far as you want to distribute the bandwidth exactly the way you want to. You can actually tell the encoder what detail level you want. You can also tell it to ignore certain parts of the image because they are only noise. All these little things are important.


On the surface, all of the DCP mastering systems may look the same, but when you really need precision, when you really need access to specific parts, it is so important that you can get in there. And that’s what QubeMaster gives you.


What do your clients like best about your work?


I think they like my passion the best. I love what I do, and even if it’s just a short movie, I’m still going to try to get the best out of it. And that’s why people like to work with me, because I am totally engaged in a project.




Dado Valentic’s facility, MyTherapy is based in London. QubeMaster Pro is part of the QubeMaster family of digital cinema applications, which also include QubeMaster Xpress 2.0, (which offers easy DCP mastering on Windows); QubeMaster Xport, (a plugin for mastering DCP with Apple Compressor on Mac OSX), and QubeMaster Packager for creating new versions of DCPs without having to re-encode the entire file.

About Qube Cinema, Inc.
Qube Cinema, based in North Hollywood, CA, is an international manufacturer and provider of end-to-end Digital Cinema technology and mastering solutions. A subsidiary of Real Image Media Technologies, Qube Cinema draws on decades of experience in cinema and a leadership position in the transition from analog to digital technology. The company is committed to creating a seamless Digital Cinema environment for exhibitors, filmmakers and postproduction companies with DCI-compliant products that are flexible, reliable and highly cost-effective. Qube Cinema’s product lines include the Qube XP-D and Qube XP-E servers, QubeMaster software solutions, Qube Keysmith KDM generation, and the new Qube Xi Integrated Media Block. For more information, visit Qube Cinema at www.qubecinema.com.

Wohler Supplies SoundField UPM-1 Stereo-to-5.1 Upmixers to All Mobile Video

SAN FRANCISCO — Nov. 1, 2011 — Wohler Technologies today announced that it has supplied three SoundField UPM-1 stereo-to-5.1 audio upmix processors to All Mobile Video (AMV), an outside broadcast, uplink, and sound stage facilities company. The sale is Wohler’s first in its capacity as a new U.S. distributor for SoundField. The UPM-1 systems will be used among AMV’s various OB vehicles to upmix videotape and archive material for 5.1 transmission, in AMV’s uplink truck, and at its Gateway teleport station in New Jersey to upmix audio for opera simulcasts from the Met in New York.

“SoundField upmix solutions for recording and processing in stereo and multichannel surround formats are renowned for their quality, which will enable AMV to maintain very high audio quality across the live performances and events the company covers,” said Michael Descouteau, vice president of sales, North America, at Wohler. “The UPM-1 is a perfect fit.”

AMV covers large-scale outside broadcast events including the MTV Video Music Awards and international sports fixtures such as the U.S. Open golf tournament and IAAF World Championships in Athletics. It also handles the OB and uplink requirements of the Metropolitan Opera’s regular international simulcasts to cinemas in Europe and Asia.

For live-to-theater events, AMV transmissions typically play in theaters equipped with surround sound systems. Because many edit houses and production companies can’t handle 5.1, and because recorded audio content coming off of tape is stereo, upmixing stereo to 5.1 is a common requirement in delivering such transmissions. AMV will use its new UPM-1 systems from SoundField to replace a variety of older upmixing boxes and to improve the overall audio quality of the 5.1 output, particularly for musical performances.

“Our older boxes work well on interview material and film soundtracks, but I’ve felt for some time that there was room for improvement on musical content,” said Ian Vysick, All Mobile Video’s head audio engineer and audio development specialist. “Tweaking things on those older processors involves accessing a lot of deep menus and repeated button-pressing, so when Wohler suggested I try the UPM-1, I asked them to bring one to a live musical event I was mixing. I couldn’t have hoped for a better test, as the show covered the three major types of content we always have to get into 5.1: music, film soundtracks, and dialogue. I compared the UPM-1 with our existing processors, and it took all of about 30 seconds to decide which was best.

“The UPM-1 was exactly what I’d been looking for, as it was easier to set up and more natural-sounding than other boxes. You put the audio in, adjust a few controls, and an amazing-sounding 5.1 upmix comes out. The sound is so impressive that while I was working with the Philadelphia Orchestra, the broadcast mix engineer there mistook the UPM-1′s 5.1-from-stereo upmix for a discrete-channel mix from his 5.1 stems. He said it was the only viable upmix he’d ever heard, and he couldn’t believe how good it sounded.”

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About SoundField U.K. manufacturer SoundField specializes in digital and analog surround and stereo microphone systems for the broadcast and recording industries. Based on a unique multicapsule design, SoundField systems allow users to capture and output audio in mono, phase-coherent stereo, 5.1, or any future surround format using a single microphone and processor. Over recent years, the company’s digital microphone systems have become the standard means of originating 5.1 audio for HD television transmission amongst many of the world’s leading broadcasters. More information is available at www.soundfield.com.

About Wohler Technologies Inc. Wohler offers a comprehensive and award-winning range of audio, video, data monitoring, and captioning products designed to provide the highest quality solutions for facilities of all sizes and complexity. Founded in 1987, the San Francisco Bay-area manufacturer has grown to become the dominant provider of confidence monitoring and signal management solutions for the broadcast and pro audio/video markets. Originally inventing and defining the category of in-rack audio, video, and data monitoring products, the company has expanded its offerings to include solutions for captioning and loudness. More information about Wohler and its full range of solutions is available at www.wohler.com.

ENDS

Veteran Studio Operator Troy Germano and Owner Jose Carlos Reyes Look to Guitar Center Professional to Help Outfit Their Soon-to-Be-Opened RG Germano™ Studios in Tampico, Mexico

— Located at a geographical crossroads, the studio is being developed by Germano and Reyes
to serve as a state-of-the-art facility for artists from around the globe —

RG Germano™ Studios Tampico is a new state-of-the-art recording facility set to open on March 1, 2012, in Tampico, Mexico. Over the last 14 months, owner Jose Carlos Reyes has worked closely with veteran studio operator Troy Germano to make this dream come to fruition. Germano’s resume is as impressive as his pedigree – from his early years learning from his father, the beloved Ed Germano of The Hit Factory, to his current venture, New York City’s Germano Studios, Troy Germano represents intense expertise and great studios. In the process of developing the new RG Germano Studios Tampico, Germano and Reyes have relied heavily on Guitar Center Professional (GC Pro), the outside sales division of Guitar Center that focuses on the needs of professional users, for products, service and support.

Germano’s relationship with the GC Pro organization goes back a long way, and it’s only gotten stronger in recent years, as he has taken a role as a member of the GC Pro Affiliate program. “Working with GC Pro makes a lot of sense,” he stated. “I have a 25-year relationship with [GC Pro Vice President] Rick Plushner, from long before he was even involved with Guitar Center. And GC Pro’s breadth of product and customer service/support are second-to-none. GC Pro gets it – we’re all on the same page in so many ways. I deal primarily with Rick, Richard Ash [GC Pro Business Development Manager for the Eastern Region] and Niyi Adelekan [NY-based GC Pro Account Manager], and I trust those three individuals implicitly. I like to know that I am working with a company that watches my back, and that’s what GC Pro does. It’s more than just a gear supplier – it’s a professional and personal relationship. We know we can rely on them, and they can rely on us.”

Reyes has big plans for the studio: “This is going to be an important place for music!” he enthuses. “Not only for Mexico, but for North America, South America, the Caribbean and Europe – all around the globe, really. It’s a very accessible destination, and there are few more beautiful places than the Mexican gulf coast. From the beginning, Troy and I have been planning this with great detail – every aspect from top to bottom, to really make it a top state-of-the-art facility with everything that’s needed to be able to service all types of music clients, in addition to film audio and pretty much anything that involves audio work. And it is going to have a friendly environment that is going to make people want to work here again and again.”

Germano does not take his involvement with this new facility lightly. “It has my name on the door,” he notes, “and I think people associate the Germano name with quality studios! I know that’s why Jose sought out my involvement. He figured that I would make this project culminate in everything that I think a studio should be. I already know that Jose is going to do a great job operating this place, and after we open up, I look forward to giving him bits of guidance on the way, like my father taught me. Everything to do and everything not to do!”

Reyes continues, noting his high regard for GC Pro: “Through it all, GC Pro has been incredibly helpful. Even though GC Pro is in the United States, it is very easy for me to get my stuff across the border to get serviced if necessary, and they send it back to me very quickly and efficiently. It’s nice to be dealing with a small number of suppliers, GC Pro being the primary one. A lot of places only sell boutique gear, for instance, but GC Pro has all that plus Guitar Center’s entire product line – instruments and all – so we can go through them for pretty much everything for our control and our live room. It’s a very wide-ranging palette, and that’s what we need.”

For more information, please visit www.gcpro.com.

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Guitar Center Professional Debuts New Ocean Way HR-3 High Resolution Reference Monitor System at AES

Guitar Center Professional (GC Pro), the outside sales division of Guitar Center that focuses on the needs of professional users, and the exclusive U.S. distributor of the famed Ocean Way Monitoring Systems, is pleased to announce the introduction of the HR-3 High Resolution Reference Monitor System. Intended as a high-definition reference point to sonically judge and discern intricate musical balances for final mixes, the Ocean Way HR-3 monitors will satisfy the most discriminating audiophile, yet still be capable of meeting the most demanding dynamic range and accuracy required by studio professionals. What separates the HR-3 from other high-end audiophile loudspeakers, apart from its use by professionals, is its capacity to provide virtually unlimited dynamic range while maintaining absolutely matched uniform frequency response between channels.

Designed by Allen Sides, the GRAMMY® Award-winning engineer, producer and mixer who founded Ocean Way Recording, the new HR-3 monitor system is the culmination of almost 40 years of his experience designing high resolution studio speaker systems for his many studios and a wide variety of commercial installations, including George Lucas’ Skywalker Ranch scoring stage; Trevor Horn’s Sarm Studios in London; and Walt Disney’s Hollywood Records, as well as private installations for musical artists like Gwen Stefani, Dave Grohl and Beck.

The two sides from 1k to 20k typically fall within 1dB of each other, creating absolute symmetry in regards to stereo imaging. The HR-3’s uniform dispersion, coupled with very smooth off-axis response from its 15-inch mid bass driver, allows for a very wide listening window, helping to eliminate the narrow “sweet spot” effect. The HR-3’s twin 12-inch subwoofers also produce extended and detailed low end to 20Hz. The unit’s power handling is an impressive 800 Watts continuous for the twin sub bass woofers, 400 Watts continuous for the mid bass woofers and 100 Watts continuous (650 Hz and up) for the high frequency driver. The HR-3 is capable of producing a maximum SPL of over 110 db at six (6) feet, 20 to 20kHz.

The Ocean Way HR-3 (in addition to the HR-2) was deigned to bridge the gap between superb audiophile speakers and accurate professional studio monitors. There is nothing currently manufactured anywhere in the world at any price that looks, sounds or performs like the Allen Sides Signature Series monitors. The monitors integrate brilliant horn designs, never fully realized from the late 1950s, with exceptional wide bandwidth, low distortion drivers and a tri-amplified / equalized electronic package second to none.

Like all Ocean Way monitors, the HR-3 is specially engineered to reveal things in users’ best recordings and mixes they may have never heard and provide dynamics they may have not thought possible. Every nuance is clearly and starkly evident. From a recording engineer’s standpoint, these are invaluable assets, allowing for the best recording and mixes possible, and from the audiophile’s standpoint, their best recordings will sound simply exceptional.

The Ocean Way HR-3 specifications are impressive:
- Frequency response +/- 2dB, 20Hz – 20kHz
- Symmetry between channels +/- 0.5 dB, 1k to 20kHz
- Maximum SPL – Over 110 dB at 6 feet, 20Hz to 20kHz
- Maximum Power Handling Capacity:
- High Frequency Driver Max 100 Watts continuous, 650 Hz and up
(Note: 1 watt in at 1k measured at 3 feet produces 108 dB)
- Mid Bass Woofer max 400 Watts continuous
- Twin Sub Bass Woofers max 800 Watts continuous
- High Frequency horn with a 90-degree by 40-degree dispersion has a 500Hz cutoff
- Crossover points: 650Hz and 80Hz, 18 dB per octave

Component description:
- High Frequency driver has a 19,000 gauss magnetic structure and titanium diaphragm with aluminum voice coil, two-inch throat
- Mid Bass woofer is 15-inch and has an 11,000 gauss magnetic structure with an aluminum voice coil
- Sub Bass woofers are twin 12-inch and have 11,000 gauss magnetic structures

Weights and size:
305 lb, 28″ width x 29″ max depth x 46″ height, each cabinet

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Korg Announces New Music App: iKaossilator for iPhone®

— Enhanced iPhone® re-creation of the palm-sized Korg Kaossilator instrument gives users Korg’s acclaimed Kaoss X-Y touchpad on the go —

Korg has added the iKaossilator for iPhone® to its lineup of music apps. The app is an enhanced version of Korg’s hardware Kaossilator instrument, and uses the iPhone’s sophisticated touchscreen to mimic the functions of the Kaoss X-Y touchpad on the original. The iKaossilator app can also run on iPad® and iPod Touch® (third generation and higher). The iKaossilator for iPhone joins Korg’s existing iPad Apps – the iElectribe Series and the iMS-20. Korg’s WIST (Wireless Sync Start Technology) feature provides new versatility.

The iKaossilator is an expressive music synthesizer offering 150 diverse sounds, combined with a five-part loop sequencer for creating multi-part tracks. As with all Korg Kaoss products, the iKaossilator is controlled by touching, tapping or stroking its X-Y touchpad with the user’s finger. This intuitive form of control is instantly rewarding, and allows users to quickly create music regardless of their instrumental training.

Generally speaking, moving the finger across the iKaossilator horizontally will control the pitch, while vertical movements will control various synthesis and sound parameters. The ability to choose one of 35 musical scales and select a musical “Key” or “Root” lets users easily play musical phrases with no wrong notes. The scales range from traditional major, minor and blues scales to more ornate Ryukyu, Spanish and Indian Raga scales.

The 150 ready-to-play sounds produce a broad range of dance music styles including hip-hop, house, techno, dubstep, new disco and electro. Sounds are divided into popular categories – the synth Leads and synth Bass sounds one would expect from a synthesizer, as well as Acoustic sounds, sounds that simulate piano or guitar Chords and even the popular Sound Effects used by DJs. The Drum sounds provide complete patterns that can be played and manipulated through finger movements on the touchscreen.

The loop sequencer allows the recording and layering of up to five musical parts to create a “track.” The user would simply assign a loop such as synth, bass, chords, sound effects, or drums to each part. Fifty loops created by professional musicians are included in the iKaossilator to get things started quickly. The loop sequencer is also a great feature for using the iKaossilator in a live performance. The Mix Play feature makes it easy to enjoy live remixing; switching seamlessly to another loop or extracting a specific part from another loop as the playback continues.

WIST (Wireless Sync-Start Technology) allows wireless synchronized performances using WIST-enabled apps on two different iPhones or iPads. Korg’s WIST-enabled apps include the “Korg iElectribe for iPad” Series and “Korg iMS-20 for iPad,” or the hardware Monotribe when using the “SyncKontrol for Monotribe” app. Korg has recently made this WIST technology available to other developers for use in their apps such as Propellerhead’s ReBirth and Retronyms’ Tabletop for iPad.

iKaossilator for iPhone is now available for download from the iTunes App store at an introductory price of USD $9.99 (special pricing is in effect through November 30th, 2011). Click here to go directly to the app page.

System Requirements
iOS 4.1or later
iPhone 5 / iPhone 4 / iPhone 3GS / iPod touch after third generation / iPad.

*All trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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Guitar Center Professional Announces New Features and Functionality for Neve Genesys Mixing Console

— Based on direct feedback from leading engineers/producers, Neve continues to expand its Genesys Console with enhanced functionality and many new features —

Guitar Center Professional (GC Pro), the outside sales division of Guitar Center that focuses on the needs of professional users, is pleased to announce new features and functionality for the Neve Genesys, a custom-crafted, expandable analog recording console that incorporates digital workstation control. Exclusively distributed in the U.S. by GC Pro, the Genesys was designed to address the new realities of the modern professional audio industry for music, postproduction and gaming, while building on Neve’s 40 years of accumulated technical heritage.

New features being unveiled at AES include:

New and updated Routing Implementation (L-C-R/Stereo)
Pro Tools track arm/disarm control from the console surface
Apple Logic Pro Integration:
Control of up to 6 Banks of 8 faders each (48 Channels)
Extensive control of Pans/Sends
DAW Metering
Ability to ‘Flip’ Pans/Sends onto Faders
Channels Encoder in DAW simulates V-Pot
EQ/Dynamics processing can be placed in any order in the audio path using the keyboard/mouse with a graphical representation of the audio chain
EQ/Dynamics Link/Copy/Paste feature
Digital Line Enable on Channels with AES/FireWire
Ability to Lock Monitor Level
Improvements for Gangs/Trims, MTC operation, FireWire clock sync

About the Neve Genesys
With its unmistakable Neve qualities of exquisite design, peerless craftsmanship and legendary Neve sound, the Genesys is a comprehensive, cost-effective solution to the challenges of audio in the digital age. The base configuration offers 16 channels of mic/line preamps, 16-channel DAW monitoring, 32-channel analog summing at mixdown, DAW control for Pro Tools, Logic, Nuendo and more, 8 auxiliary buses, 8 group buses, 2 main outputs, 4 effects returns, comprehensive metering, 5.1 monitoring, 2 cue mixes, talkback services and an internal power supply. What sets the Genesys apart is its remarkable combination of features and affordability — an affordable Neve analog console with Neve’s legendary sound and digital control at a cost of less than $50,000 enables the widest possible range of professionals to make a genuine Neve console the heart of their studios. Furthermore, the Genesys has the ability to upgrade as studio owners’ requirements change — it can be expanded to over 60 channels in a straight or articulated frame, with options including motorized fader automation, recall, mastering-grade A/D and D/A converters, digitally controlled EQ and dynamics, remote mic amp control and much more.

For more information, please visit www.gcpro.com.

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KataData iPhone App Calculates Storage and Runtime by Camera Type or Codec

The new KataData storage and runtime calculator is an indispensable iPhone app for on-set, post production, and even non-technical positions. Emery Wells, founder of Katabatic Digital (NYC) – a grading, finishing, and VFX studio in New York City – knows this first hand. With the plethora of digital cameras and formats hitting the market, Wells developed the KataData app to alleviate all the pain in data planning and management for their post artists and lab technicians, as well as clients. And now, KataData is available to the broad spectrum of filmmakers and post-production facilities at the iPhone App Store for only $4.99.

KataData was built for filmmakers and post artists, supporting an extensive list of cameras, such as RED 4K and 5K Epic, Phantom, ARRI Alexa, Canon DSLR, as well as a wide range of codecs, such as DPX, Open EXR, DNxHD, and ProRes. KataData’s ease of use eliminates hours of calculations and frustration: just enter the amount of footage you have by file size (MB, GB, or TB) and KataData will calculate the runtime or storage. Or enter multiple calculations and add them together.

“For today’s apps, an intuitive user interface is a must have, so we’ve built in some cool features like swipe gestures to convert units and time code, and for RED camera users, it’s also easy to calculate stereo and HDRx options,” says Wells. “We’ll continue to add more features based on user feedback. If market demand is there, we’ll build it.”

What KataData Users Are Saying
Get a quick demo on YouTube and learn why first users are singing its praises.

Director/photographer Vince Laforet: “KataData is an incredibly graceful app that allows you to take the mystery out of all of these camera calculations and avoid the inevitable headaches that come with.”

Jim Hare, Sydney Australia: “Absolutely brilliant! I have several multicam shoots coming up using RED Epics and R1s and this app will be essential for locking down REDcode ratios. Just bought it and downloaded. Fantastic!”

Jason Wingrove – Director/Cinematographer: “There’s simply not an app in existence that does what KataData does. Trust me, I’ve bought them all.”

For a quick demo, go to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=EceX_oD7A-M.

Specifications
Available immediately at $4.99, KataData runs on iOS 4 or later. It’s designed for the iPhone, but will also run on the iPod and iPad. For detailed specifications and a full listing of supported cameras and codecs, visit www.katabatic.tv/katadata.

To download the KataData app, go to http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/katadata/id464141210?ls=1&mt=8

Katabatic Digital (NYC) is a digital cinema company that blends creativity with technology to provide digital post production services for high-quality visual projects such as ad campaigns, music videos, and TV episodes. Katabatic works with any camera/format, such as RED Epic 5K and4K, ARRI Alexa, Phantom, Canon SLRS, Sony F3, and more and also provides rentals of the RED Epic and RED 4K cameras, including on-set technical expertise. ASSIMILATE’s SCRATCH is Katabatic’s data workflow of choice for real-time post production, from conform, color grading, dailies, client reviews, through finishing. Katabatic’s portfolio includes high-end music videos and TV spots for Beyonce, Cee-Lo and Saturday Night Live, and advertising for major household brands, such as Google Wallet, Google Chrome, Vonage, Jaguar, Goldman Sachs, and more. To learn more about Katabatic Digital, see www.katabatic.tv, or call 212-620-0818.

Location Audio Specialists ToneMesa Rely on HK Audio Elements for Sound Reinforcement on Popular Television Shows

ToneMesa, Inc. is a location/post audio service and rental company based in Los Angeles. Their high-profile clientele includes Nickelodeon, several major consumer brands and top-rated television shows such as The X Factor. Company partners Daniel McCoy and Stanley Gonzales were recently on location for an outdoor video shoot during filming for upcoming episodes of the popular TV show The X Factor. They needed a portable, modular and inconspicuous sound reinforcement solution, so John Karr at Rat Sound Systems, Inc., a local touring sound, sales, rentals and installation company, set them up with an HK Audio Elements system as an ultra-compact playback system.

As John Karr recounts, “I recommended HK Elements, as it’s the best sounding, most cost-effective solution for a portable line array within the allotted budget. The HKs sound much cleaner and more professional than the equivalent from other well-known lines, hands down. So, recommending Elements was a no brainer. It’s small and lightweight, with a professional sound that’s excellent for playback and small acoustic acts – a definite winner in our book for these types of applications.”

McCoy and Gonzales chose a “Band Two” configuration (four mid-high units, two amps, two subs, two active subs and mounting hardware) to provide the sound and power they needed in a discreet footprint that was also easy to set up and transport.

Partner Stanley Gonzales explains how it solved some of their critical requirements: “My partner Daniel is the audio supervisor for The X Factor. As with most clients, he was asked to ensure that the gear wasn’t visible, so we needed something low-profile and easy to hide, or if it was seen, it was something very sleek. The Elements system proved an easy solution for that challenge. They could put a small tree in front of it and it would disappear! The other challenge was that while the speakers needed to be unobtrusive, they still had to be close to the talent, and we found that feedback was never an issue, despite the high SPL. And of course, we needed something that sounded great. In fact, many of the top artists on the set took notice, were wondering what it was, and were amazed and impressed with the sound. HK really delivered for us, on all levels!”

ToneMesa is also using their HK Elements system for current Nickelodeon TV shows and other applications that require the gear to “disappear, yet deliver.”

For more information about HK Audio, visit: http://www.hkaudio.com/us; for Rat Sound Systems, please visit: www.ratsound.com; for ToneMesa, please visit www.tonemesa.com .

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