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See New Yorkers in Slow-Motion in Wonderous Short Film, 'Still Life'

Charles Frank and Jake Oleson direct the short film, "Still Life" which captures New Yorkers doing a variety of activities in slow-motion. The film was shot with a RED Epic and Phantom Miro.

Watch below.

Here's the 'Yosemite HD' Time-Lapse Sequel You've Been Waiting For

It took Colin Delehanty and Sheldon Neill almost two years to gather the stunning images that make up the sequel to their viral time-lapse hit, "Yosemite HD."

The pair hiked over 200 miles into rough terrain to reveal rarely seen vistas from the national park. They shot photos with the Canon 5D Mark III and also used the Sony NEX-FS700 and RED Epic to capture slow-motion shots of nature at its breathtaking best.

Watch below and read more here on Re/code.

Watch a Music Video Captured on an Infrared RED Epic

Joshua Lipworth used a customized infrared RED Epic to capture the otherworldly imagery found in his music video for To Be Frank's "Half the Man."

He explained on Reddit, "The camera essentially had the OLPF removed, which allowed all light to hit the sensor (including visible) and a special firmware installed. We then had the option to cut a visible light filter to go in front of the sensor/behind the lens or put a filter in front of the lens - as we were using stills lenses on this shoot it was quite easy to buy screw in filters which is the way we went. Cutting filters for behind the lens would be better though because it reduces lens issue."

RED Epic vs. Canon C500

DP Shane Hurlbut writes up his exensive camera tests of the Canon C500 and RED Epic for feature film Need for Speed. He goes over everything from underexposing to fill ratio and more and gives side by side image and videos comparisons.

He writes, "What I really took away from this test was that it is absolutely essential to use the right camera sensor for what it does best. The Red Epic did well with under exposing, but then fell short in the night driving scene where underexposure is everywhere. It had a very hard time with IR pollution and delivered across the board a more magenta image. The C500 delivered great skin tones, a very clean image with ND filtration without IR pollution and owned the night, but fell short in the over exposure area."

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera vs. DSLRs and RED Epic

In the below video, Dave Dugdale from Learning DSLR Video reviews the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera in comparison to DSLRs and the RED Epic.

He says, "There's a lot of excitement about this camera. Basically, there's three things that I was most excited about before I even got it. One is the high dynamic range. Two, really good codec. And three, a price for less than a thousand dollars." He also goes on to say that Blackmagic "is relatively small when you compare them to Canon. But what they lack in size, they make up for in guts because they are a disruptive company, which is great for us."

Watch below.

Celebrate Shark Week with 5K Footage Shot on a RED Epic

It's Shark Week, so why not celebrate with some beautiful 5K footage of the mysterious predators shot with a RED Epic. The video was shot by Andy Brandy Casagrande IV.

Watch below.

John Brawley Shoots Visually Stunning CocoRosie Video on RED Epic

Cinematographer John Brawley blogs in-depth about his experiencing shooting the stunning music video for CocoRosie's "Child Bride," directed by Emma Freeman.

Writes Brawley, "Using the RED EPIC and the Canon 30-300 supplied by Inspiration studios I was able to pick off a number of shots as our groom attempted to row across the lake ! We shot 5k WS on the RED using Redcode 7:1 . I knew we’d also be doing a lot of handheld and I love the RED EPIC for it’s really small form factor and higher frame rates compared with say an Alexa."

Read the full post here and watch the finished video below.

Camera Movement and Conversation: Capturing the Loosely Scripted Series 'Family Tree'

Christopher Guest’s latest project, the HBO original series Family Tree, features many of the hallmarks of the other “mockumentary” films he’s directed, including This Is Spinal Tap, A Mighty Wind, Best in Show, Waiting for Guffman and For Your Consideration. All of these comedic films feature actors playing unselfconsciously funny characters with sincere, if somewhat ridiculous, aspirations. Guest’s modus operandi often involves improvised scenes, ensemble casts and Super 16 film. The latter three films were made with the same cinematographer: Roberto Schaefer, ASC.

Camera Movement and Conversation: Capturing the Loosely Scripted Series 'Family Tree'

Slide text: 
<p>Christopher Guest&rsquo;s latest project, the HBO original series<em> Family Tree,</em> features many of the hallmarks of the other &ldquo;mockumentary&rdquo; films he&rsquo;s directed, including <em>This Is Spinal Tap, A Mighty Wind, Best in Show, Waiting for Guffman </em>and<em> For Your Consideration. </em>All of these comedic films feature actors playing unselfconsciously funny characters with sincere, if somewhat ridiculous, aspirations. Guest&rsquo;s <em>modus operandi</em> often involves improvised scenes, ensemble casts and Super 16 film. The latter three films were made with the same cinematographer: Roberto Schaefer, ASC.</p>

Christopher Guest’s latest project, the HBO original series Family Tree, features many of the hallmarks of the other “mockumentary” films he’s directed, including This Is Spinal Tap, A Mighty Wind, Best in Show, Waiting for Guffman and For Your Consideration. All of these comedic films feature actors playing unselfconsciously funny characters with sincere, if somewhat ridiculous, aspirations. Guest’s modus operandi often involves improvised scenes, ensemble casts and Super 16 film. The latter three films were made with the same cinematographer: Roberto Schaefer, ASC.

DP Laurie Rose and Director Ben Wheatley Create Own Lenses for Trippy Black and White Film 'A Field in England'

In the behind-the-scenes video below, director Ben Wheatley and DP Laurie Rose explain how they shot their psychedlic, black and white period piece A Field in England in just 12 days on a tiny budget. They specifically discuss using old and cheap lenses and even creating their own lenses for the film, which was shot on a RED Epic and Canon C300.

Says Wheatley of the 'bad lenses,' "But they look beautiful, very soft and kind of ethereal."

Watch below and read more here on Filmmaker Magazine.

Shakespeare in A 12-Day Shoot: Joss Whedon’s Monochrome, Modern-Day 'Much Ado About Nothing'

After completing production on the tentpole blockbuster The Avengers in 2011, director Joss Whedon decided to take a very different route on his next project, gathering a small group of actors and crew in his house to shoot a small-scope feature quickly and cheaply. As if that weren’t enough of a departure for the mind behind such genre favorites as Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dollhouse, he also planned to use a Shakespeare comedy as his script.

Shakespeare in A 12-Day Shoot: Joss Whedon’s Monochrome, Modern-Day 'Much Ado About Nothing'

Slide text: 
<p>After completing production on the tentpole blockbuster <em>The Avengers </em>in 2011<em>,</em> director Joss Whedon decided to take a very different route on his next project, gathering a small group of actors and crew in his house to shoot a small-scope feature quickly and cheaply. As if that weren&rsquo;t enough of a departure for the mind behind such genre favorites as <em>Buffy the Vampire Slayer</em>,<em> Firefly</em> and <em>Dollhouse</em>, he also planned to use a Shakespeare comedy as his script.</p> <p>Cinematographer Jay Hunter, who&rsquo;d worked as second unit on <em>Firefly</em> (for main unit DP Lisa Wiegand), remembers the phone call he got from Whedon regarding <em>Much Ado About Nothing. </em>&ldquo;He said, &lsquo;I&rsquo;m doing this movie. I want to shoot very quickly. It&rsquo;s totally self-financed. Do you want to talk about it?&rsquo; Of course I did!&rdquo;</p> <p>Hunter visited Whedon&rsquo;s house. Over breakfast the director laid out his general plan, which involved shooting for ten days (ultimately two days of pickups were added), doing a completely faithful rendition of the play but in modern dress, and making the film in black and white.</p> <p>In terms of pages per day, the pace &ldquo;would be like a very heavy episodic TV schedule,&rdquo; Hunter explains. &ldquo;And add to that [the fact that] a page of Shakespeare is like three pages of normal dialogue. So we knew it would be a mountain of work.&rdquo;</p> <p>The cinematographer was game to take on the challenge Whedon laid out and was delighted about the black and white aspect. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m thinking, This is awesome! When do you get a chance to do that?&rdquo; But he had to ask Whedon <em>why</em> he was thinking about black and white. &ldquo;Not that I&rsquo;m going to argue against it, but I was curious what the reasoning was,&rdquo; Hunter says.</p> <p>&ldquo;He had some practical, logistical ideas,&rdquo; Hunter continues. &ldquo;It would simplify issues having to do with the color of walls and wardrobe. And we both felt it would help to bring the audience out of the contemporary world and into a more stylized environment that could help bridge the gap to the point where the Shakespearian dialogue wouldn&rsquo;t seem out of place.&rdquo;</p> <p>A fan of French New Wave cinema, Hunter imagined an approach to lighting similar to the look of those mid-century films&mdash;with more reflected, naturalistic lighting than one would find in movies that took a <em>noir</em> thriller approach to black and white photography. &ldquo;I started mentioning Godard and Truffaut and Chabrol,&rdquo; the cinematographer recalls. &ldquo;I just wanted to see, does his face kind of scrunch up? Should I quickly start talking about <em>Casablanca</em>? But he was on the same page. He knows those movies and likes them a lot, and we were able to refer to them throughout the planning and shooting.&rdquo;</p> <p>Hunter shot with <a href="http://www.red.com/products/epic">RED EPIC</a> cameras, lamenting, &ldquo;What a bummer the Monochrome wasn&rsquo;t out at the time! It&rsquo;s like that camera was made for our film!&rdquo; He shot with a single set of <a href="http://www.panavision.com/content/primo-primes-0?l=1&amp;c=0&amp;p=13">Panavision Primo</a> prime lenses, no zooms, on the two EPICs used to cover most of the scenes. Camera placement was generally along the same axis, with one camera using a wide lens and the other a significantly longer optic for tight shots&mdash;a common setup, but it was necessary here because of the single set of primes.</p> <p>&ldquo;My gaffer, George Maxwell, and I both own small lighting companies,&rdquo; Hunter notes. &ldquo;The budget only had enough money for a small handful of units, but we brought whatever we thought we needed. The biggest lights were some 4K HMIs and some ARRI M18 HMIs. We didn&rsquo;t use a lot of trucks. Instead of a five-ton truck, we had Joss Whedon&rsquo;s garage. The art department brought extra resources too. Everyone brought their best game because we wanted to make the best movie possible.&rdquo;</p> <p>For day interiors, Hunter pounded the big lights through windows. Inside he used a lot of smaller tungsten units bounced into cards and diffused with light grid cloth or silks for a non-directional source. Night exteriors were motivated by a few practicals or candles, and the general illumination was brought up with a large number of smaller units. &ldquo;We had Jem Balls and China balls hidden behind pretty much every column and tree to give us this very soft light coming up from below the actors,&rdquo; he elaborates.</p> <p>Hunter rated the EPIC at EI 800 primarily for interiors and night exteriors and dialed it back to 320 for day exteriors. Even at the slower speed he used extensive ND filtration to keep stops as wide as T4 or 5.6. &ldquo;I didn&rsquo;t want too deep a stop, but I also didn&rsquo;t want something so shallow that the ACs would jump off a cliff after work.&rdquo;</p> <p>In keeping with the French New Wave style of filmmaking, Hunter made use of as much handheld camera work as possible, allowing operators to get in close to the actors and move freely through the scene. &ldquo;When I see Shakespeare brought to the screen,&rdquo; he observes, &ldquo;it tends to be with long lenses and dollies in a formal, proscenium arch type of way where you&rsquo;re distanced from the action. When I see that approach, I think, Why don&rsquo;t I just go see the play in a theater? Joss and I thought, What if we get in there close with the camera, where we can move with them or whip pan from one to the other? It&rsquo;s not documentary style so much as a first-person narrative approach.&rdquo;</p> <p>Hunter recalls being very pleased when he saw the finished film at the Toronto Film Festival last fall. &ldquo;People who might normally be turned off by Shakespeare really responded,&rdquo; he says.</p> <p>He stresses that making the film was hard work. The effort was successful because of Whedon&rsquo;s ability to visualize exactly what he wanted and stick to the plan during the long, strenuous shooting days.</p> <p>&ldquo;I read somewhere that the production was like &lsquo;a big party,&rsquo; he notes. &ldquo;It <em>was</em>, in the sense that we had a blast doing it, but it was a very focused work environment. Joss creates a lighthearted, pleasant atmosphere on set, but he keeps everyone focused. It was the kind of environment where people would laugh a lot but work as hard as they&rsquo;ve ever worked. The rumors that people were just drinking and having fun throughout the shoot are ridiculous. Everything was meticulously planned. If we&rsquo;d just shown up and tried to figure out blocking on the day, we&rsquo;d never have finished.&rdquo;&nbsp; &nbsp;</p>

After completing production on the tentpole blockbuster The Avengers in 2011, director Joss Whedon decided to take a very different route on his next project, gathering a small group of actors and crew in his house to shoot a small-scope feature quickly and cheaply. As if that weren’t enough of a departure for the mind behind such genre favorites as Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dollhouse, he also planned to use a Shakespeare comedy as his script.

'Arrested Development' Lands at Netflix: Relaunch of Fan Favorite Expands the Streaming Business Model

Slide text: 
<p>Following an involuntary &ldquo;hiatus&rdquo; of more than seven years, an entirely new fourth season of the critically praised, low-rated Fox sitcom <em>Arrested Development</em> becomes available exclusively for <a href="http://netflix.com">Netflix</a> streaming on May 26 at 12:01 a.m. PST. As with Netflix&rsquo;s initial foray into original content production earlier this year with the first-season release of the Kevin Spacey political thriller <em>House of Cards</em>, the <em>Arrested Development</em> release is widely expected to spur weekend binge viewing parties over the Memorial Day weekend by a few million fans of the Jason Bateman cult sitcom.</p>

Following an involuntary “hiatus” of more than seven years, an entirely new fourth season of the critically praised, low-rated Fox sitcom Arrested Development becomes available exclusively for Netflix streaming on May 26 at 12:01 a.m. PST. As with Netflix’s initial foray into original content production earlier this year with the first-season release of the Kevin Spacey political thriller House of Cards, the Arrested Development release is widely expected to spur weekend binge viewing parties over the Memorial Day weekend by a few million fans of the Jason Bateman cult sitcom.

'Arrested Development' Lands at Netflix: Relaunch of Fan Favorite Expands the Streaming Business Model

Following an involuntary “hiatus” of more than seven years, an entirely new fourth season of the critically praised, low-rated Fox sitcom Arrested Development becomes available exclusively for Netflix streaming on May 26 at 12:01 a.m. PST. As with Netflix’s initial foray into original content production earlier this year with the first-season release of the Kevin Spacey political thriller House of Cards, the Arrested Development release is widely expected to spur weekend binge viewing parties over the Memorial Day weekend by a few million fans of the Jason Bateman cult sitcom.

RED Epic vs. Canon 5D Mark III Raw

DP Luke Neumann has tested out the RED Epic versus the Canon 5D Mark III raw. Watch his thoughts on it below in a video interview with Big League Film School.

4K Helicopter Cam Ups the Gnar in Gorgeous Skiing Videos

Jakob Schiller of Wired writes: Extreme sports demand extreme documentation, and the latest example of this involves mounting a $750,000 4K Ultra High-Definition camera rig to a helicopter to capture luscious skiing videos that rival Hollywood blockbusters.

Earlier this year Teton Gravity Research, a production company with several well-known ski and snowboard films under its belt, announced that it was the first company to use the new Gyro-Stabilized Systems' C520, a portable five-axis gyro-stabilized camera platform that works with several 4K cameras including the RED Epic.

READ THE FULL STORY HERE.

 

Breaking Color Barriers with RED on '42'

ICG Magazine profiles the cinematography of Jackie Robinson biopic 42, and how DP Don Burgess brought an era most often seen through black and white photography to vivid color with a RED Epic.

Says Light Iron CEO and RED specialist Michael Cioni, "Not every DP understands how to leverage the RED’s capabilities. Don can take the exact same camera and workflow and make it work for three different movies with completely different looks.”

Read the full piece here.

RED Epic Shoots CoverGirl Commercial and Print Ads

To shoot CoverGirl's latest print and live-action ad in one go, Marcus K. Jones turned to the RED Epic. Jones shot the below spot and then pulled stills from his shoot to go into print including bus and magazine ads. (via RED)

DP Kenny Stoff on Shooting 'Sound City' with the RED Epic

Cinematographer Kenny Stoff talks about shooting Dave Grohl's rock documentary Sound City with the RED Epic. He says, "RED, especially the Epic, is really ideal for music documentary, because it's interview and it's performance. So you need that sort of music video capability for the performance that's sort of glossy or high-end looking. And you need sort of the gritty and raw documentary run-and-gun capabilities. So, for me, the Epic was the only conclusion."

Watch the interview here.

Watch Short Film, 'Host,' Shot by Philip Bloom on the RED Epic

Danny Lacey's short film "Host" is now available to view online. It has the distinction of being the first narrative that Philip Bloom shot on the RED Epic and was made for about $500.

Watch it below and read more production notes from Lacey and Bloom here on Bloom's blog.

ARRI Alexa vs. BMCC vs. RED Epic: Low Light

Cinematographer Ryan E. Walters continues his three-part comparison of the ARRI Alexa, Blackmagic Cinema Camera and RED Epic with his second installment, which tests low-light capabilities. He writes, "The more I explore and experiment in my craft, the more interested I am in what happens at the limits of our recording mediums. I am definitely pushing these cameras to their limits...If you are looking for clear winners and losers then you've come to the wrong place, as that is not the point of test. The point is to see how these tools perform when they are pushed beyond what is normal, or considered safe.

ARRI Alexa vs. BMCC vs. RED Epic: IR Testing

Cinematographer Ryan E. Walters pits the ARRI Alexa, Blackmagic Cinema Camera and the RED Epic against each other in a series of tests, the first being how "each of the cameras handles IR contamination as ND is increased."

Watch the results below and read more here on Walters' blog (where you can also download the raw files).

Marc Ritzema Shoots an Epically Beautiful Skateboarding Short for Red Bull

DP Marc Ritzema shot Red Bull's latest skateboarding short film starring Ryan Sheckler, Torey Pudwill, Ryan Decenzo and Zered Bassett. He used a RED Epic and a Phantom Flex to capture some truly beautiful shots. Watch below. (via Fstoppers)

Natural Selection: Equipping Wildlife Documentaries

Barely five years ago the Panasonic VariCam was the principal acquisition device on wildlife television series, including the BBC blockbusters Planet Earth and Blue Planet, but today you would be hard-pressed to find any major wildlife TV series relying on 720p/60 VariCams, despite their superb colorimetry and “film look.”

Watch a New York Minute Filmed Entirely in HDR on the RED Epic

Colby Moore presents a montage of New York scenes all shot in high-dynamic range on the RED Epic. He explains on his Vimeo page, "A short and creepy montage of scenes shot around the ever-photogenic island of Manhattan -- filmed entirely in high-dynamic range and comprised of some HDR Timelapse footage I shot, along with a collection of slow-motion and normal 24fps footage processed from Red Epic-X RAW video that I recently captured and then exported as -2,0+2 TIFF stacks to be tone mapped in Photomatix using a batch processing workflow.

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