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Greig Fraser

Greig Fraser Goes Dark for 'Zero Dark Thirty'

Zero Dark Thirty cinematographer Greig Fraser talks to Definition Magazine about his challenging, but rewarding, run-and-gun shoot.

The Run-and-Gun Style of 'Zero Dark Thirty'

American Cinematographer delves into the collaboration between cinematographer Greig Fraser and director Kathryn Bigelow on action thriller Zero Dark Thirty.

Greig Fraser on the Crafty, Invisible Art of Cinematography

Zero Dark Thirty DP Greig Fraser talks extensively to The Credits about everything from shooting digital for the first time to storyboarding to the stealthy art of cinematography.

DP Greig Fraser Pulls Back from Perfection for 'Zero Dark Thirty'

Cinematographer Greig Fraser talks to the New York Times about some of the challenges of shooting Zero Dark Thirty, which involved a climactic scene filmed in near pitch darkness. Says Fraser, "We wanted to try to avoid ‘filmisms,’ classic filmmaking tricks, in making this. There’s always the temptation, as a cinematographer, to make the shot look as perfect as possible. But we tried to pull back a little bit on those false ideas visually and strip it down to its essence.”

Read the full piece here.

Night Vision: Cinematographer Greig Fraser Captures Kathryn Bigelow’s 'Zero Dark Thirty'

Director Kathryn Bigelow’s 2008 war drama The Hurt Locker swept the Oscars for its powerfully realistic portrayal of an Iraq war bomb squad unit. Bigelow’s follow up this year, the even more ambitious war-themed feature Zero Dark Thirty, is receiving the same kind of accolades. The film, which starts with the 9/11 attack and concludes with the Navy SEAL’s raid of Osama bin Laden’s Pakistan compound, is told in a very straightforward way; Bigelow embraces a style designed to make viewers feel like they’re observing real life unfold without the traditional trappings that indicate that we’re watching a war movie.

Night Vision: Cinematographer Greig Fraser Captures Kathryn Bigelow’s 'Zero Dark Thirty'

Slide text: 
<p>Director Kathryn Bigelow&rsquo;s 2008 war drama The Hurt Locker swept the Oscars for its powerfully realistic portrayal of an Iraq war bomb squad unit. Bigelow&rsquo;s follow up this year, the even more ambitious war-themed feature Zero Dark Thirty, is receiving the same kind of accolades. The film, which starts with the 9/11 attack and concludes with the Navy SEAL&rsquo;s raid of Osama bin Laden&rsquo;s Pakistan compound, is told in a very straightforward way; Bigelow embraces a style designed to make viewers feel like they&rsquo;re observing real life unfold without the traditional trappings that indicate that we&rsquo;re watching a war movie.</p>

Director Kathryn Bigelow’s 2008 war drama The Hurt Locker swept the Oscars for its powerfully realistic portrayal of an Iraq war bomb squad unit. Bigelow’s follow up this year, the even more ambitious war-themed feature Zero Dark Thirty, is receiving the same kind of accolades. The film, which starts with the 9/11 attack and concludes with the Navy SEAL’s raid of Osama bin Laden’s Pakistan compound, is told in a very straightforward way; Bigelow embraces a style designed to make viewers feel like they’re observing real life unfold without the traditional trappings that indicate that we’re watching a war movie.

Cinematographer Greig Fraser on Shooting in Darkness for 'Zero Dark Thirty'

Cinematographer Greig Fraser talks to HitFix about achieving the look of Zero Dark Thirty, especially shooting in darkness for the climactic final scene depicting the capture of Osama Bin Laden.

He says, "This is one thing I will absolutely give credit to both [director] Kathryn [Bigelow] and to [writer] Mark [Boal] for. Their drive to be as realistic as possible in this film. I mean, it makes life hard for technicians like myself. But Kathryn would say, 'We want to go real. We want the viewer to believe they’re in bin Laden’s front yard walking towards that front door as much as possible.'"

Read the full article here.

'Killing Them Softly' Gets Its Look with a New Film Stock

Director Andrew Dominik and cinematographer Greig Fraser talk to American Cinematographer about shooting their stylish new crime drama Killing Them Softly using a new film stock, the Kodak 500T 5230. Says Dominik, "I was very interested in doing something that didn’t look lit, and Greig’s attitude about that was really good — his [approach] is very much about reacting to what’s there at a location and supplementing it. Our basic idea was a low-con image, a kind of creaminess, that harked back to a look that might have existed in the Seventies.

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