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Style and Suspense: P.T. Anderson's 'Phantom Thread'

"A good dollop of suspense with a love story is a nice combination."11/02/2017 6:30 PM Eastern
"It's not your standard love story," director Paul Thomas Anderson tells Kevin P. Sullivan about his new film, Phantom Thread. "It's more peculiar for sure. A lot of directors have tried and failed to make Rebecca. I'm probably next in line, but it's a different story.

"I'm a large aficionado of those large Gothic romance movies as the old masters might do them. What I like about those kinds of love stories is that they're very suspenseful. A good dollop of suspense with a love story is a nice combination." To read the full interview, click here.

The film's official description: Set in the glamour of 1950s post-war London, renowned dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis) and his sister Cyril (Lesley Manville) are at the center of British fashion, dressing royalty, movie stars, heiresses, socialites, debutants, and dames with the distinct style of The House of Woodcock.

Women come and go through Woodcock's life, providing the confirmed bachelor with inspiration and companionship, until he comes across a young, strong-willed woman, Alma (Vicky Krieps), who soon becomes a fixture in his life as his muse and lover. Once controlled and planned, he finds his carefully tailored life disrupted by love.

With his latest film, Paul Thomas Anderson paints an illuminating portrait both of an artist on a creative journey, and the women who keep his world running. 

You'll Want to Live Inside Paul Thomas Anderson's Masterful Film

Paul Thomas Anderson Opens Up About Phantom Thread

Paul Thomas Anderson Breaks on Phantom Thread: "It's Not Your Standard Love Story"

Official Poster and Trailer for Phantom Thread Released



"It's fitting that Paul Thomas Anderson, a filmmaker known for fastidious craftsmanship, decided to make a movie about a fastidious craftsman," says Andrew Crump. "It's true that Anderson has compared his new film Phantom Thread to Alfred Hitchcock's Rebecca; it's also true that the comparison clicks.

"Anderson's movies grow less flashy and more subtle as you trace the arc of his growth as a director; currently he's in a period of subtlety and delicacy, working with such a deliberate hand on his movies that you may not notice him in the frame at all. His unobtrusive aesthetic, calibrated to highlight his actors and, of course, the fashion, belies its deceptive luxuriousness. This is a movie you'll want to live in for the pure joy of reveling in Anderson's effortless mastery." To read the full article, click here



The Career of Paul Thomas Anderson: A Five-Part Video Essay

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