cpn connect
careers

In 'It,' HDR Darkness is the Scariest of All

"In the Dolby Cinema version, we were able to take advantage of that very high contrast range that lets you have a scene that feels significantly darker."9/13/2017 3:15 PM Eastern
Bill Skarsgard as Pennywise in New Line Cinema's horror thriller 'It,' a Warner Bros. Pictures release

Directed by André Muschietti and shot by cinematographer Chung-hoon Chun, It, from New Line Cinema and Warner Bros., pits a group of small-town kids, known collectively as the losers' club, against a murderous shape-shifting clown, Pennywise.

Colorist Stephen Nakamura of Deluxe's Company 3, who completed It's DI in Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve at sister facility EFILM, explains the approach to the film's imagery: "The [filmmakers] didn't want to make a 'creepy world."

Instead, the film captures the sleepy atmosphere of small-town, USA, playing against that expectation happening primarily in fully-lit spaces until the action literally goes underground to the sewers, where darkness itself is used to push the scariness even further. "Sometimes the scariest thing is what you don't expect," Nakamura says. "If the movie is set in this normal, happy town and all this crazy stuff goes down, it's that much creepier. There are some fairly brutal moments, but we left the environment looking beautiful outside."

Nakamura notes that the scenes set in darkness work powerfully in the standard D-cinema (at 14 footlamberts) and even more so in the 31-footlambert HDR pass they completed for the Dolby Cinema version.

Caption: Bill Skarsgard as Pennywise in New Line Cinema's 'It," a Warner Bros. Pictures release. Photo by Brooke Palmer

 "In the Dolby Cinema version, we were able to take advantage of that very high contrast range that lets you have a scene that feels significantly darker while it also shows more detail. You're pushing more light through the images overall and the contrast ratio is massive. It feels more like really being in a very dark space where you can just make out some details. It's a very effective tool to have for this kind of movie."



 

 

 

Want to read more stories like this?
Get our Free Newsletter Here!