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Thread: Best Outsource Method?

  1. #1
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    Default Best Outsource Method?

    I do a lot if not all of the cutting our (my film group's) projects on FCP from my home. Our colorist does all of his work from as well. What's the best way to outsource my cut material for color grading? Should I have the FCP XML file on an external with the capture scratch for him to bring home, then he save the Color XML file on the external and then give it all back to me? Then I can open Color and select "send to?" If Apple has a proper way aside from this then I'm all ears!

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
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    I'd media manage your final edit to an external hard drive and give the colorist that. Then they send to FCP back when they're done on the same hard drive and return to you.

    Noah
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  3. #3
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    Thanks for the help. I suppose media management is FCP 101 level stuff. I'm really less of a post person and more of a producer/director so I'm still learning the ins and outs.

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    New User Mike Barber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zahne View Post
    Thanks for the help. I suppose media management is FCP 101 level stuff. I'm really less of a post person and more of a producer/director so I'm still learning the ins and outs.
    Some food for thought: I would recommend getting a "real" editor. Not only do they already know the technical ins and outs, but they also bring a fresh set of objective eyes to your project. Producers/Directors tend to make, to be honest, awful editors. In my experience, they tend to often focus on the wrong details and are too attached to certain shots or ideas that it prevents the project from being all it can be.
    Mike Barber

  5. #5

    Default This is very helpful!

    I would grab a copy of "Auto Collapse" http://www.editmule.com/
    This would collapse your timeline down to one line of video.
    This would make it much easier for your colorist. Using DaVinci and or
    color. Most of those programs won't accept an XML. So collapsing your timeline then giving them a standard edl is a nice thing. Then once they grade it they can spit out new files and you can re-import that into FCP.
    IF they are using Color then the fcp project is the way to go. Then they can use the XML file and go back and forth.
    CJ Adams
    Freelance Colorist:
    Simplexity digital post
    cjadams@simplexitydigital.com


    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Barber View Post
    Some food for thought: I would recommend getting a "real" editor. Not only do they already know the technical ins and outs, but they also bring a fresh set of objective eyes to your project. Producers/Directors tend to make, to be honest, awful editors. In my experience, they tend to often focus on the wrong details and are too attached to certain shots or ideas that it prevents the project from being all it can be.

  6. #6
    Expert BenB's Avatar
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    I know several directors/producers who are top notch editors. I'd personally never say one profession can't do another, since our industry is seeing this multi-talent type of person more and more often.

    I'll also say, as a consultant and trainer, I meet lots and lots of editors every week who are not nearly as technically competent as they'd like to believe. Nothing personal to editors in general, but, know your limits, and be very careful of making broad generalizations about a profession. Ours is so varied now, there are no valid generalizations anymore.

    If you're in FCS3 you don't need to collapse to one video track for Color. But the Edit Mule utilities are great if you've got an earlier version of FCP. Not that they automatically do only one track, but will reduce down to as few tracks as possible, without destroying any media.

    I'm totally on board with Noah about this. Keep things simple, make sure you're colorist is on FCS3, make life easier on yourself.
    Last edited by BenB; 10-04-2010 at 01:06 PM.
    Digital Media Instructor for
    Louisiana State University & Delgado College

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